Black Eyed Peas

1/31/2013

 
Black-eyed peas are a great source of protein, although they need to be served with a whole grain such as brown rice in order for a complete protein...One serving of Black-eyed peas contains 10 percent of your daily iron needs...Iron plays a key role in oxygen transport...So, when iron is lacking in your diet it can negatively affect your physical work performance due  to a decrease in oxygen transport to the working muscles...However, your body does not absorb all of the iron in non-meat sources...To better receive the absorption of iron from non-meat sources such as Black-eyed peas, make sure to consume them with either a meat such as chicken or vitamin C such as a glass of orange juice...As always, stay clear of caffeinated beverages, especially while consuming a meal high in iron...Caffeine inhibits iron absorption...Like many legumes, black-eyed peas contain soluble fiber, which helps your body get rid of cholesterol, thereby lowering your risk of heart disease...

Black-eyed peas naturally contain no fat cholesterol or sodium...When people prepare them, that is when fat and these other non-essential ingredients are used...To avoid this, soak the black-eyed peas in water overnight...Then, simmer the black-eyed peas on the stove for 2 hours...Use 3 cups of water per 1 cup of peas...You can also simmer them in a crock pot for 6-8 hours...Salt to taste...Use sparingly of course...You can also obtain black-eyed peas from a can...Be sure to use a low sodium source...

NUTRITION FACTS
Serving size: ½ cup black-eyed peas
Calories 70 Calories 
Total Fat: 0g
Total Carbohydrate: 16g
Dietary Fiber: 4g 
Protein: 3g      
Vitamin A: 15%
Vitamin C: 4%
Calcium: 10%
Iron: 6%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet
 

Chicken

1/17/2013

 
Skinless chicken breast has about 240 calories per 6 ounces and breast with skin has about 340 calories...3 ounces of chicken is one serving and is the size equivalent of a deck of playing cards...

Chicken also has calcium in it... Four ounces of cooked chicken has about 17 milligrams...The body requires calcium for muscles to move...About 1,000 mg is recommended for an active adult...1,000 mg daily for active adults is the recommendation for calcium intake...Calcium's most well-known function is its role in bone formation and its ability to work in tandem with other nutrients to strengthen bones and teeth...

Chicken has about 290 mg per 4 ounces, of potassium...Potassium helps to maintain a proper fluid balance in your body...Potassium is also in charge of properly storing enough carbohydrates in your body to utilize for energy by fueling your muscles...The frequency and degree to which your muscles contract is heavily dependent on the right amount of potassium in the body...Your body loses potassium through urine and sweat...So, obviously extra important to add some of this important electrolyte back into the body after a vigorous  sweat enhancing workout...I like to consume some low calorie Gatorade after my extra-long runs...Gatorade is my choice of fuel for my energy...Other sport drinks, preferably low in sodium, are also electrolyte replacements...(Try my HIIT suggestions for a vigorous Sweat Fest)...

Chicken has no carbohydrates...
 

Collard Greens

1/10/2013

 
My favorite collard greens are from a can...I am sure to use a low sodium source, but I find that because I cannot prepare them well, I get this cholesterol-lowering source from YES a can...As an excellent source of vitamin K and a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, collard greens provide us with anti-inflammatory nutrients that involves cardiovascular support...

Each 1-cup serving of cooked collard greens contains about 50 calories, 4 grams protein and 9 grams carbohydrates...Collard greens have no cholesterol and take up only 1 percent of your daily allotment of fat and sodium with each serving...